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Welcome Light in Your Homes & Hearts

By Naina Grewal , 19 Oct, 2017
  • Welcome Light in Your Homes & Hearts

Upon the cusp of dusk, hundreds of auras fill the October air with their golden glow. Divas adorn the city from the holiest places of worship to the comfort of family homes.

 
 
 
 
 
The warmth and wholeness of a fresh essence transcends deep within the hearts of those that witness it. A celebration of oneness and optimism, this is Diwali – the festival of lights. 
 
Literally translating to a line (awli) of clay lamps (deepa/deewa), Deepawli has over time become a representation of religious, cultural and social sentiments. 
 
 
From a historical standpoint, Diwali marks the return of King Rama to the city of Ayodhya after defeating Raavana in Hindu mythology. Diwali is also interpreted as the start of a new financial year. As winter engulfs the crops, farmers seal the last harvest of the season by praying  to Goddess Lakshmi for financial prosperity in the upcoming year. 
 
In Sikhism, the day of Diwali coincides with the celebration of Bandi Chorch Divas, signifying the day that Guru Hargobind Sahib Ji (the sixth Guru) freed 52 kings with himself as he was released from Mughal Emperor Jahangir’s prison. Whichever angle of history relates with you most, your childhood may have been laced with such sagas or similar variations that trace back the origins of the festival. Till date, across countries, devotees continue igniting the purity of religious traditions with feelings of humility, appreciation and love. 
 
 

"In the moment which you light the wick
and place it on your balcony with your very hands,
realize that you have the same power in your life.
No matter how much you seek meaning from
external sources to bring purpose into your life,
the control is really in your hands."

 
 
Undoubtedly, though, it is really the five senses that undergo a treat during the time of Diwali. Music fills the air with a nostalgic undertone, reviving old memories and paving the road to make new ones. The house is bursting with aromatic invitations of various delicacies and sweets. Little ones run around with their outfits in excitement of wearing them for the evening. The visual delight is unparalleled as braids of light gently immerse neighbourhoods in their radiance and luminosity. 
 
However, these lights transition much beyond the materialistic realm. While Diwali very much so is a combination of the aforementioned elements, the festival is incomplete if the light and ambience does not touch your inner being. The mighty flame of the deewa is not just a visual showpiece, but rather is a symbol. As light eradicates the darkness of the autumn evening, the warmth and positivity is a ray of hope. 
 
 

"The festival is incomplete if the light
and ambience does not touch your inner being.
The mighty flame of the deewa
is not just a visual showpiece,
but rather is a symbol. As light eradicates
the darkness of the autumn evening,
the warmth and positivity is a ray of hope."

 
 
In the moment which you light the wick and place it on your balcony with your very hands, realize that you have the same power in your life. No matter how much you seek meaning from external sources to bring purpose into your life, the control is really in your hands. All situations, in your favour or not, are subjective. It is your perspective that moulds any situation into one that helps or worsens your state of being. The lens with which you see each moment in life has the potential to turn any situation into an obstacle or stepping stone towards something better. 
 
Diwali teaches us to take a step towards ourselves and initiate self-love and positivity. Through the spark within you, that light then shines bright on everyone around you. Take this opportunity to erase the grievances of the past and revive forsaken relationships. A humble gesture of picking up the phone and wishing someone a Happy Diwali has the power to repair, replenish and enhance bonds. A small, yet fulfilling greeting is not only joyful on the receiving end, but can be surprisingly rewarding and satisfying for you as well. The light is a constant loop that survives from both sides; the more positive your relationship is with others, the more rejuvenated your relationship is with yourself – and vice versa.
 
 

"Diwali teaches us to take a steptowards ourselves
and initiate self-love and positivity. Through the spark within you,
that light then shines bright on everyone around you.
Take this opportunity to erase the grievances
of the past and revive forsaken relationships." 

 
Every deewa brightens the world a little more. This year, take every particle of light you see as your guide and mentor. As you drench yourself in the rich celebrations of Diwali, recall that the light within you has the privilege to shine much brighter than the limitations of your imagination. No matter where you are in your journey of life, appreciate both the hardship and the contentment – it is darkness, after all, that allows light to weave its magic. 
 
This Diwali, with open arms and an open mind, let the pavilion of hope make its presence known as you welcome light in your homes and hearts.

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