Monday, November 20, 2017
ADVT 
Health

Cows Can Cure HIV. Surprised? Well This Is What Researchers In The US Have Found

Darpan News Desk IANS, 25 Jul, 2017
  • Cows Can Cure HIV. Surprised? Well This Is What Researchers In The US Have Found

A study published in journal Nature by researchers at Scripps Research Institute, the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) and Texas A&M University has found that cows hold the clue to HIV cure.

 

The researchers were able to induce potent antibodies against HIV in cows. Cows never get infected by HIV. Their immune systems produce unique antibodies against infections.

 

As part of the research, the scientists injected four calves with HIV immunogens, reports the Time.com. The researchers discovered that the cows quickly developed bNAbs, or a neutralising antibody that defends a cell from an antigen or infectious body by neutralizing any effect it has biologically, to HIV in their blood.

 

 

An immunogen is any antigen capable of inducing humoral and/or cell-mediated immune response instead of immunological response.

 

The scientists were pleasantly shocked by the unique discovery. “I was shocked,” TIME quoted study author Devin Sok as saying. He said that the calves developed responses against HIV at an unanticipated speed. Not only this, the scientists were also able to isolate the antibodies from the calves and they identified “NC-Cow 1” as the most powerful antibody attacking the HIV.

 
 
With the study, the scientists were able to study how the immune systems of cows is capable of creating such antibodies.

 

Cows cannot be infected with HIV, of course. But these findings illuminate a new goal for HIV vaccine researchers: by increasing the number of human antibodies with long loops, we might have an easier chance of eliciting protective bnAbs by vaccination," the researchers noted.

 

While no one knows definitively why these powerful antibodies evolved in cattle, one theory holds that the key could be in long loops of bNAbs, called HCDR3, which are tied to the animals’ extensive gastrointestinal systems. The researchers note that a promising approach to HIV vaccine development may be to promote the human immune system’s development of long HCDR3 loops.

 

“HIV is a human virus,” said Devin Sok, a study leader and Antibody Discovery and Development Director at IAVI, “but researchers can certainly learn from immune responses across the animal kingdom.”

 
 
 
According to TIME, understanding of the immune system of cows that effectively develops antibodies against HIV is a “valuable information” for the scientists, who are hoping to develop an HIV vaccine. It will, however, depend on whether the scientists are able to develop a way through which human bodies can mimic the process through which cows create these antibodies.
 

Scientists have so far been unable to develop a vaccine against HIV. After this study, the researchers are hopeful of applying their finding on humans.

MORE Health ARTICLES

Tomatoes Have The Power To Ward Off Skin Cancer Risk, Say Scientists!

Tomatoes Have The Power To Ward Off Skin Cancer Risk, Say Scientists!
Daily tomato consumption has been found to cut the development of skin cancer tumours by half in mice, scientists say.

Tomatoes Have The Power To Ward Off Skin Cancer Risk, Say Scientists!

Male Children With Older Dads Are More Geeky, Suggests Study

Male Children With Older Dads Are More Geeky, Suggests Study

If you consider yourself as a geeky guy, your dad's age at the time of your birth could have had a major part in forming your personality.

Male Children With Older Dads Are More Geeky, Suggests Study

Overweight Teens Are 80% More Likely To Suffer A Stroke In Adulthood

Overweight Teens Are 80% More Likely To Suffer A Stroke In Adulthood

Parents please take note! If your son becomes overweight during his teenage years then he is 80 percent more likely to have a stroke in adulthood, warns a study.

Overweight Teens Are 80% More Likely To Suffer A Stroke In Adulthood

Reusing Plastic Bottles Could Do You More Harm Than Good

Reusing Plastic Bottles Could Do You More Harm Than Good

That's because the plastic bottle you're constantly replenishing isn't made to be re-filled - meaning it could have the potential to leach chemicals and harbour harmful bacteria.

Reusing Plastic Bottles Could Do You More Harm Than Good