Friday, June 18, 2021
ADVT 
Interesting

Burger King addresses elephant in the room, and it's a cow

Darpan News Desk The Canadian Press, 14 Jul, 2020 08:18 PM
  • Burger King addresses elephant in the room, and it's a cow

Burger King is staging an intervention with its cows.

The chain has rebalanced the diet of some of the cows by adding lemon grass in a bid to limit bovines contributions to climate change. By tweaking their diet, Burger King said Tuesday that it believes it can reduce a cows' daily methane emissions by about 33%.

Cows emit methane as a by-product of their digestion, and that has become a potential public relations hurdle for major burger chains.

Greenhouse gas emissions from the agriculture sector made up 9.9% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2018, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Of that amount, methane emissions from livestock (called enteric fermentation) comprised more than a quarter of the emissions from the agriculture sector.

With an over-the-top social media campaig n that teeters between vulgarity and science (sprinkled with more vulgarity), Burger King is banking on the heightened awareness of climate change and its responsibility to limit its own role.

According to a recent poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, about two out of three Americans say corporations have a responsibility to combat climate change. The gravitational pull of climate change is increasingly finding its way onto national political stage.

Potential customers are also cutting down on the amount of meat they consume, citing both environmental and dietary concerns. Burger King and rival McDonald's have added meat alternatives to their menus.

Two years ago McDonald's said it was taking steps to cut the greenhouse gases it emits. It tweaked the manner in which the beef in its Big Macs and Quarter Pounders was produced. The company said at the time that it expected the changes to prevent 150 million metric tons (165 million tons) of greenhouse gas emissions from being released into the atmosphere by 2030.

Burger King worked with scientists at the Autonomous University at the State of Mexico and at the University of California, Davis to test and develop its formula of adding 100 grams of lemongrass leaves to the cows’ daily diets. Preliminary tests indicate that the lemongrass leaves help the cows release less methane as they digest their food.

On Tuesday, Burger King introduced its Reduced Methane Emissions Beef Whopper, made with beef sourced from cows that emit reduced methane, in select restaurants in Miami, New York, Austin, Portland and Los Angeles, while supplies last.

MORE Interesting ARTICLES

Daisies bring a sunny look to the garden

Daisies bring a sunny look to the garden

Daisies are my favourite, too. For me, a daisy is the essence of “flowerness.”Daisies also hold attraction for poets. Geoffrey Chaucer, English poet of the 14th century, wrote "...of all the floures in the mede, Thanne love I most thise floures white and rede, Swiche as men callen dayses in our toune.”

Daisies bring a sunny look to the garden

White-throated sparrows change their tunes

White-throated sparrows change their tunes

White-throated sparrows are changing their tune — an unprecedented development scientists say has caused them to sit up and take note.

White-throated sparrows change their tunes

Urban gardening surges amid pandemic lockdown

Urban gardening surges amid pandemic lockdown

Anita Clarke had been thinking about starting a vegetable garden on her balcony for a while before COVID-19 lockdown. But it was always easy to put off, the Toronto-based Shopify managing editor says.

Urban gardening surges amid pandemic lockdown

Friend or fowl: Making peace with Canada geese

Friend or fowl: Making peace with Canada geese

They came, they honked, they conquered. Flying in their signature V-formation, Canada geese are often hailed as a symbol of the Canadian wilderness, marking the change of seasons with their southern migration each winter and return every spring.

Friend or fowl: Making peace with Canada geese

A box of teeth and scientific serendipity unveil the lives of bottlenose whales

A box of teeth and scientific serendipity unveil the lives of bottlenose whales

The walnut-sized teeth taken from northern bottlenose whales slaughtered in the 1960s and 70s are proving to be storehouses of knowledge that raise awareness about the fragile future of the endangered species.

A box of teeth and scientific serendipity unveil the lives of bottlenose whales

Restaurant chains jump on ghost kitchen trend to boost sales during COVID-19

Restaurant chains jump on ghost kitchen trend to boost sales during COVID-19

When the COVID-19 outbreak forced many restaurants to shutter dining rooms across Canada, Vancouver-based Joey Restaurants responded by opening two "ghost kitchens" — a new model being adopted for delivery- and pick-up-only spaces.

Restaurant chains jump on ghost kitchen trend to boost sales during COVID-19