Close X
Saturday, July 20, 2019
ADVT 
Life

Canada's oldest woman dies at 114, 'serene, content, grateful and positive'

Darpan News Desk The Canadian Press, 07 Jun, 2019
  • Canada's oldest woman dies at 114, 'serene, content, grateful and positive'

Canada's oldest woman, whose longevity and zest for life won her national attention — and an admiring nod from astronaut Chris Hadfield — has died at 114.

Ellen "Dolly" Gibb was born in Winnipeg on April 25, 1905 — a time when Wilfrid Laurier was prime minister, Teddy Roosevelt was the U.S. president and neighbouring Alberta and Saskatchewan hadn't even joined Confederation.

Her obituary says Gibb was the oldest person in North America, and ninth oldest in the world.

She died Wednesday in North Bay, Ont. The local McGuinty Funeral Home confirmed her death on Friday.

In her obituary, her family credited her long life to "great genetics and diet, regular walks, a love of family and generosity to others."

It said she had a sharp mind and no chronic ailments, with only one short stay in hospital since giving birth to her daughter Sue in 1939, and remained "serene, content, grateful and positive to the end."

On Friday morning, Hadfield — who had featured her on his speaking tour — acknowledged the loss of a woman who had been Canada's oldest living person for more than three years.

"The longest of lives. I stand quiet and salute you, Dolly Gibb — rest now in peace," Hadfield tweeted.

Gibb was the daughter of a Metis woman and a Scottish-Canadian prospector who had sought his fortune in the Klondike gold rush, according to her obituary.

Her mother died after giving birth to her sister when Gibb was five, and her father raised Gibb and her siblings on a small farm in what is now Winnipeg.

Gibb herself lost her husband after 40 years of marriage in 1968. She was also pre-deceased by a daughter and granddaughter but survived by a daughter, nine grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren and 12 great-great-grandchildren, along with a large extended family.

A celebration of her life will be held Saturday in North Bay.

Ontario Finance Minister Victor Fedeli had joined Gibb to celebrate her 114th birthday in North Bay in April, and presented her with "celebratory scrolls" from himself and Premier Doug Ford.

MORE Life ARTICLES

Two writers to be awarded $65K Griffin Poetry Prize at Toronto gala

Two writers to be awarded $65K Griffin Poetry Prize at Toronto gala

Two poets -- one Canadian, one international -- will take home $65,000 apiece at the Griffin gala in Toronto's Distillery District.

Two writers to be awarded $65K Griffin Poetry Prize at Toronto gala

Survey suggests Canadians eager to shift from plastic packages, but cost a factor

Survey suggests Canadians eager to shift from plastic packages, but cost a factor

Seven out of 10 respondents also said they support a ban of all single-use plastics used for food packaging.

Survey suggests Canadians eager to shift from plastic packages, but cost a factor

Tanya Tagaq and seven other writers take home prizes at Indigenous Voices Awards

Tanya Tagaq and seven other writers take home prizes at Indigenous Voices Awards

The IVAs handed out a total of $16,000 in honours to eight emerging Indigenous writers at a Vancouver gala on Tuesday.

Tanya Tagaq and seven other writers take home prizes at Indigenous Voices Awards

Playland Nights return with special 19+ evenings

Playland Nights return with special 19+ evenings

Adults are once again invited to enjoy Playland in an unforgettable atmosphere with new and unique entertainment during every Friday night in July

 

Playland Nights return with special 19+ evenings

No country to achieve gender equality by 2030: Report

No country to achieve gender equality by 2030: Report

Melinda Gates, co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, said the SDG Gender Index launched on Monday "should serve as a wake-up call to the world", the Guardian reported.

No country to achieve gender equality by 2030: Report

Popularity of audio technology is a factor in decline of braille: experts

Popularity of audio technology is a factor in decline of braille: experts

Teaching braille and learning to read large print was not always done together because audio was cheaper and easier to provide

Popularity of audio technology is a factor in decline of braille: experts

PrevNext