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Finding the Right Employee

By Steven Cardwell, 20 May, 2019
  • Finding the Right Employee

Finding candidates with complex skill sets will require more than a simple job posting.

 

 

It can be hard to find the right candidate to join your company’s team. Posting a job ad online and sharing through your social media channels will certainly put the opportunity in front of a lot of eyes but there is a big difference between the number of people who will see your ad and the quality of the candidates who are interested in applying.

If all you do is put a job notice on an online board, you are ceding control over who may be interested in the job you have open. You will get responses from a vast array of people, many of whom likely do not have the specialized skill sets you are seeking. It results in a lot of wasted time for minimal results. There are several mistakes companies can make when seeking a new hire:

Don’t know what they are looking for

A long-time employee retires, and the company seeks to replace that person with someone with the same skill set. But that approach doesn’t take into account how the job could be adapted for the modern economy. Are there new skills that could be added to the search that will enhance the role?

The best candidates aren’t looking

One of the biggest problems with a public job posting is that the best candidate for your position is likely already working elsewhere in the field. Those people are searching the job ads. But at the right compensation point, they may be willing to make a change.

Over-reliance on technology

Social media is a great tool for connecting with people, and channels such as LinkedIn are great for bringing workers to employers. However, there is nothing that compares with old-fashioned one-on-one contact when seeking new additions to your team.

Accepting what you have been given

It is time-consuming to draft a job description, take it to market and then sift through the applicants. But if the quality of the field is low, there is no need to settle for the best of what may be poor crop. It does mean it is time to rethink your recruitment strategy.

They Do it alone

There are a lot of moving parts to make a business successful. Dedicating the time and resources to finding new team members takes away from the pursuit of success. But there are firms who can take on the task of finding you the right person for your job, ensuring they have the skill set to meet your needs and the personality to fit with your existing team.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Steven Cardwell is a 20-year veteran of recruiting and General Manager of the recruitment firm ESF Careers.

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