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150 overdose deaths in October

Darpan News Desk The Canadian Press, 30 Nov, 2023 03:31 PM
  • 150 overdose deaths in October

British Columbia's coroner says the toxic and unregulated drug supply has claimed more than 2,000 lives in the province in the first ten months of this year. 

A statement from the coroners' service says in October alone 189 people died from overdoses, which is more than six deaths a day.

It is also the 37th consecutive month where at least 150 people died from illicit overdoses. 

The service says more than 13,300 people have died because of poisoned drugs since the crisis was declared in April 2016.

Jennifer Whiteside, minister of mental health and addictions, says in a statement that they recognize the depth of grief the figures represent, and her government continues to work urgently to provide access to effective care.

The corner says males make up more than three-quarters of the 2023 death toll, about seven of every 10 people who died this year were between 30 and 59 years old and overdose is the leading cause of death in B.C. for those aged 10 to 59. 

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