Thursday, October 21, 2021
ADVT 
National

277 COVID19 cases over 3 days

Darpan News Desk BC Government, 14 Jun, 2021 03:31 PM
  • 277 COVID19 cases over 3 days

There were 277 new cases of COVID-19 over the weekend for a total of 146,453 cases in British Columbia. This includes 96 new cases from June 11 to 12, 113 new cases from June 12 to 13 and 68 new cases in the last 24 hours.

68 new cases in a day is the lowest reported number since September 28th.  That is nearly 9 months ago. The average 7 day case number is now 132, the lowest it has been since October 11.

There are currently 1,537 active cases of COVID-19 in the province. Of the active cases, 136 individuals are currently hospitalized, 42 of whom are in ICU. 

There have been 4 new COVID-19 related deaths over a 3 day period, for a total of 1,734 deaths in British Columbia.

New cases by health region Coastal - 36 (12 a day) Fraser - 148 (49 per day) Island - 12 (4) Interior - 63 (21) Northern - 16 (5) Outside Canada - 2 (fewer than 1).

75.9% of all adults in B.C. and 74.1% of those 12 and older have now received their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. In total, 4,048,346 doses of COVID-19 vaccines have been administered in B.C., 613,453 of which are second doses.

14.2% of the adult population are fully vaccinated.

Health restrictions will be eased on indoor gatherings, group activities and travel within British Columbia on Tuesday as COVID-19 immunization rates rise and case counts decline, Premier John Horgan says.

The province will take the next step forward in its restart plan announced last month, which aims to allow life to return to pre-pandemic times after Labour Day, he told a news conference on Monday.

Horgan said the plan is careful and safe, adding that the province will monitor COVID-19 case data and take guidance from provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry as it approaches Canada Day, when the third step in the reopening plan is scheduled to take effect.

"Dr. Bonnie Henry's modelling shows we're on the right path," he said. "Case counts are declining, hospitalizations are stabilizing and vaccine rates are climbing at a positive rate. What we need to do now is take the next careful steps forward."

Henry said the reopening is based largely on B.C. exceeding targets for minimum vaccine levels, with more than 75 per cent of residents now having received their first shot. Health officials had set a 65 per cent first-dose vaccination rate to move to the second step of the reopening plan, she said.

The second step means indoor seated gatherings to a maximum of 50 people are permitted at venues including movie theatres, banquet halls and live theatre performances, Henry said. High-intensity indoor fitness classes can resume and bars will be able to serve liquor until midnight. Indoor faith gatherings to a maximum of 50 people or up to 10 per cent of the capacity of a place of worship will also be permitted.

But Henry said safety protocols, including mask wearing indoors and physical distancing, remain in place. Health officials will monitor COVID-19 case data as the date approaches for the next step in the reopening plan on July 1.

"We may need to slow going forward depending on what happens, and this next couple of weeks will be very key for that and right now the public health orders are still in place," she said.

Henry said she is confident B.C. will move onto steps three and four in the plan, but she will monitor COVID-19 transmission rates just in case.

"There are always things that are unknown," she said. "We are watching very carefully. I don't expect, with what we know now, we'll have to go back."

Henry said as first-dose vaccine rates reach 85 per cent and higher in B.C. and second shots also increase, the province will continue to better manage the virus and the return to normal will get closer.

"I am absolutely optimistic about our brighter days ahead," she said. "This will be our summer of hope and healing."

MORE National ARTICLES

Vancouver residents could be paying up to $1000 for parking permits for new vehicles

Vancouver residents could be paying up to $1000 for parking permits for new vehicles
  • An annual pollution charge the city’s “Climate Emergency Parking Program” proposes Vancouverites who own a 2023 or newer “high-polluting” vehicle — described as a gas-powered luxury sports car, large SUV or full-size pickup truck — would be charged $1,000 per year to get a residential parking permit.

Vancouver residents could be paying up to $1000 for parking permits for new vehicles

Canada wants 'robust' COVID-19 probe: Hajdu

Canada wants 'robust' COVID-19 probe: Hajdu

The federal government wants a "robust" and ongoing investigation into the origins of the novel coronavirus, Health Minister Patty Hajdu said in the House of Commons Monday ahead of an expected grilling by MPs examining Canada's relationship with China.

Canada wants 'robust' COVID-19 probe: Hajdu

Toxin found at park in Richmond, B.C.: RCMP

Toxin found at park in Richmond, B.C.: RCMP

The RCMP say a resident reported finding the squirrels in South Arm Community Park and fire crews identified the substance as 1-Octanethiol, a compound used in the production of other chemicals that can be dangerous if it's not handled correctly.

Toxin found at park in Richmond, B.C.: RCMP

Experts debate easing rules for fully vaccinated

Experts debate easing rules for fully vaccinated

As provinces accelerate their efforts to get their populations fully vaccinated against COVID-19, some people are calling for the federal government to issue clear guidance on what people can do once they receive both shots.

Experts debate easing rules for fully vaccinated

Vaccines preventing hospitalizations from Delta

Vaccines preventing hospitalizations from Delta

A new study in England suggests the Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines are extremely good at keeping people from ending up in the hospital with COVID-19, even after just one dose.

Vaccines preventing hospitalizations from Delta

Uppal apologizes for role in divisive policies

Uppal apologizes for role in divisive policies

A former Conservative cabinet minister is apologizing for not pushing against his party's culturally divisive polices of the Stephen Harper era, including an effort to ban face coverings during citizenship ceremonies.

Uppal apologizes for role in divisive policies

PrevNext