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Canadian accused of Trump threat denied cash

Darpan News Desk The Canadian Press, 07 Jan, 2022 01:53 PM
  • Canadian accused of Trump threat denied cash

WASHINGTON - A Quebec woman accused of mailing poison to then-president Donald Trump will not have more than US$2,000 seized by American authorities returned to her.

Dabney L. Friedrich, a federal judge in Washington, D.C., today denied a motion from Pascale Ferrier for the return of the money, which was seized when she was arrested at the United States border in September 2020.

Lawyers representing Ferrier, who is detained in a Washington prison, argued during a virtual court appearance that she needs the money to buy such items as shampoo, undergarments and additional food, as well as to call her family in Canada.

But the judge sided with a federal prosecutor, who argued the money is evidence that could be presented in court.

Prosecutor Michael Friedman also said a sealed filing relating to actions Ferrier is alleged to have taken after her arrest suggests returning the money could pose a public safety risk.

Friedman has asked the court to order Ferrier to undergo a 30-day mental health evaluation, a motion that has been opposed by the defence. Friedrich did not rule on that request today, asking the prosecution to provide more information about how long the evaluation would take.

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