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Residency for families of plane-crash victims

Darpan News Desk The Canadian Press, 13 May, 2021 10:31 AM
  • Residency for families of plane-crash victims

 Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino announced a new policy to help the families of victims of two major airline disasters become permanent residents in Canada.

The new policy will apply to relatives of anyone who died on board Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 or Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, so long as those victims were Canadian citizens, permanent residents or found eligible on their application for permanent residency.

The policy applies to people currently in Canada, and anyone who made a refugee claim after these two disasters happened is also eligible to apply under the new policy.

He says the federal government is introducing this public policy, which will remain in place until May 11, 2022, to demonstrate compassion and solidarity with the families in their efforts to seek justice.

Fifty-five Canadian citizens and 30 permanent residents were among the 176 people killed when a Ukrainian jetliner was shot down by an Iranian surface-to-air missile minutes after taking off from Tehran on Jan. 8, 2020.

The Ethiopian Airlines passenger plane crashed near Addis Ababa on March 10, 2019 claiming the lives of 157 people, including 18 Canadians.

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