Close X
Thursday, January 20, 2022
ADVT 
National

Trudeau leaves for G7, NATO after London attack

Darpan News Desk The Canadian Press, 10 Jun, 2021 10:14 AM
  • Trudeau leaves for G7, NATO after London attack

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has left Canada for a G7 summit as the country is seized by tragedy and demands for justice for Indigenous Peoples and Muslims.

Trudeau is to arrive in Cornwall, U.K., today for a three-day gathering with G7 leaders and then travel to Brussels for a NATO summit, followed by a meeting between Canada and the European Union.

Ending the pandemic, recovering the global economy — including for international travel — and getting vaccines to less wealthy countries dominates the agenda for the G7.

Recently though, Canada's economic and health responses to COVID-19 have been eclipsed by an outpouring of grief over the targeted killing of a Muslim family, and a First Nation's discovery of what are believed to be the remains of 215 Indigenous children at a former residential school.

Trudeau spoke at a vigil two days ago in London, Ont., for the Afzaal family. Four members of the family died when a man drove a truck into them while they were out for a walk Sunday evening. A nine-year-old boy survived.

The prime minister called it a terrorist attack.

His Liberal government has also faced questions over its lack of progress on a promise to implement the 94 calls to action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission into Canada's former residential school system.

As well, Trudeau has been urging Pope Francis to apologize for the Catholic Church's role in operating these facilities, where generations of Indigenous children suffered abuse and isolation from their families and culture.

Heading into the G7, Trudeau's office says besides the pandemic, he will focus on climate change — a major policy plank for his Liberal government — as well as economic growth and co-ordinating approaches to promote gender equality and human rights.

Canada also joins other countries whose finance ministers signed on to a tax reform that would set a global minimum corporate tax of at least 15 per cent, which has drawn criticism from the Opposition Conservatives who say the country should handle tax policy on its own.

Trudeau's trip marks a few firsts.

It's his first travel outside of Canada in more than a year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the first time all G7 leaders will be in the same room since 2019 — and without former U.S. president Donald Trump.

Current U.S. President Joe Biden will also make his first trip abroad since being elected to the White House last fall to attend the summit, providing the first chance for him and Trudeau to talk face-to-facesince he took office.

New York Rep. Brian Higgins said Thursday the White House has confirmed Biden and Trudeau are set to meet on the margins of the G7 summit, and that they will discuss plans to reopen the Canada-U.S. border. Higgins, one of the most vocal U.S. critics of the ongoing border restrictions, was taking part in a panel discussion on the issue alongside Liberal MP Wayne Easter.

"This is the most exclusive club in the world," said John Kirton, director of the G7 Research Group at the University of Toronto.

"Sometimes it’s what I’ve called the lonely hearts club — or group therapy session. Nobody but the fellow leaders of the most powerful democratic countries in the world governing advanced economies can understand how tough that job is.”

Trudeau travels having received one of his two doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca shot. His office said he will quarantine for up to three days at a hotel in Ottawa when he returns next week.

The G7 includes Canada, the U.S. and United Kingdom, Japan, France, Italy and Germany, as well as the European Union.

Summit observers say Trudeau enters being the leader who has served the second-longest, next only to German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has asked countries to come with concrete commitments on how to end the pandemic by the end of 2022.

Experts say Canada will have to decide how it wants to contribute to that effort, for example through financing or donating vaccines.

It hasn't announced any plans to share its vaccines despite having guaranteed delivery of more than 100 million doses for the year when giving the population its two doses requires 76 million.

 

MORE National ARTICLES

Trudeau, Biden to talk border at G7: Higgins

Trudeau, Biden to talk border at G7: Higgins

The White House said the pair, who are in the United Kingdom for the three-day summit that gets underway Friday, will discuss the matter before the weekend, Rep. Brian Higgins told a panel discussion hosted by the Tourism Industry Association of Canada.

Trudeau, Biden to talk border at G7: Higgins

PBO: Student aid revamp may cost feds more

PBO: Student aid revamp may cost feds more

The Liberals proposed a sweeping package in the April budget to ease student loan costs and expand a non-repayable grant program for tens of thousands of post-secondary students and recent graduates.

PBO: Student aid revamp may cost feds more

Under Biden, Canada's opinion of U.S. soars: Pew

Under Biden, Canada's opinion of U.S. soars: Pew

The global Pew Research Center study released Thursday points to strikingly similar shifts in sentiment elsewhere around the world in the months since Biden took over the Oval Office.

Under Biden, Canada's opinion of U.S. soars: Pew

Canada's COVID-19 infections continue to plummet

Canada's COVID-19 infections continue to plummet

Canada's COVID-19 infections are at the lowest level since last September, with the seven-day average of new cases sitting at 1,611 as of Wednesday.

Canada's COVID-19 infections continue to plummet

Commons committee blasts Liberals over WE deal

Commons committee blasts Liberals over WE deal

The report from the House of Commons ethics committees followed months of contentious hearings and the release of thousands of pages of documents since last spring, when the government first inked the agreement with WE.

Commons committee blasts Liberals over WE deal

Liberals need help from NDP to speed net-zero bill

Liberals need help from NDP to speed net-zero bill

The net-zero legislation sets legally binding greenhouse gas emission reduction targets over the next three decades, culminating in net zero emissions no later than 2050.

Liberals need help from NDP to speed net-zero bill

PrevNext