Wednesday, June 16, 2021
ADVT 
National

AstraZeneca recipients shouldn't regret it: Quach

Darpan News Desk The Canadian Press, 06 May, 2021 07:00 PM
  • AstraZeneca recipients shouldn't regret it: Quach

The chair of the National Advisory Committee on Immunization says people who already got the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine should not feel they made a bad choice.

Dr. Caroline Quach and the other 15 members of NACI were accused of sowing seeds of confusion and vaccine hesitancy when they recommended for a second time that Canadians who aren't at high risk from COVID-19 may want to wait to get vaccinated until a dose of Pfizer-BioNtech or Moderna is available.

AstraZeneca and the Johnson & Johnson vaccine are believed to pose a risk of a new vaccine-induced blood clotting syndrome that is extremely rare but very serious and sometimes fatal.

In a statement, Quach says NACI's message wasn't meant to give AstraZeneca recipients vaccine remorse, noting the first dose has similar success at preventing hospitalization and death from COVID-19 as one dose of Pfizer or Moderna.

She says people who did get it should know they did the right thing to protect themselves and their families and anyone who is at moderate or high risk of COVID-19 infections should still get whatever vaccine they are offered first.

Quach says unvaccinated people who are at low risk of COVID-19 infections may want to look at the balance of risks between a vaccine that may pose a rare but potentially fatal side effect and one that doesn't.

More than 1.7 million Canadians have been vaccinated with at least one dose of AstraZeneca and Canada has reported at least 11 cases of vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenia or VITT.

Three of those patients have died.

Most Canadians won't be faced with choosing AstraZeneca now versus waiting for Pfizer or Moderna because most of the 2.3 million doses of AstraZeneca already delivered to Canada have been used and there are currently only shipments expected from Pfizer and Moderna.

MORE National ARTICLES

NDP pledges 20 per cent foreign buyers' tax

NDP pledges 20 per cent foreign buyers' tax

The campaign-style promise aims to drive down increasingly unaffordable rental and home prices that have rippled beyond Toronto and Vancouver into outlying towns and cities from Nova Scotia to British Columbia's Fraser Valley.

NDP pledges 20 per cent foreign buyers' tax

Hospital turned away woman sick from shot: friend

Hospital turned away woman sick from shot: friend

Alberta chief medical officer of health, Dr. Deena Hinshaw, announced Tuesday that the death of the 52-year-old woman was due to a rare blood clot disorder — one of three such fatalities in Canada.

Hospital turned away woman sick from shot: friend

Canada 'oddly absent' from waiver debate: critics

Canada 'oddly absent' from waiver debate: critics

The idea is to make vaccine formulas and expertise more widely available so more countries could develop their own supply. Canada expressed support for the U.S. decision, but has so far refused to say whether it would also support the waiver and take part in the talks.

Canada 'oddly absent' from waiver debate: critics

Feds face pressure to ease mat leave access

Feds face pressure to ease mat leave access

The Opposition Conservatives are asking the Liberals to allow expecting mothers to qualify for their full employment insurance parental leave, even if they currently receiving federal unemployment aid.

 

 

Feds face pressure to ease mat leave access

Toronto Police need public's help in finding missing man Pritpal

Toronto Police need public's help in finding missing man Pritpal

He is described as 5'3, 230 lbs., with grey hair (worn under turban), a grey beard, brown eyes, a curved scar on his right cheek, a scar on his nose and right eyebrow, and has a tattoo on his left hand.

Toronto Police need public's help in finding missing man Pritpal

No relief in skyrocketing housing prices for Metro Vancouver for a few years: CMHC

No relief in skyrocketing housing prices for Metro Vancouver for a few years: CMHC

The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation projects by late 2023 the pace of rising home prices will slow down from 2020 highs. While the pace of prices won't rise as quickly, prices themselves will still stay high. 

No relief in skyrocketing housing prices for Metro Vancouver for a few years: CMHC

PrevNext